A Bereaved Mother I Don’t Get – אם שכולה שאיני מבין

Shimon Peres at a visit to the bereaved Stern family

Shimon Peres at a visit to the bereaved Stern family

(Bilingual post, for English, scroll down to the end of the Hebrew text)

The war in Gaza has taken most of its toll on the Palestinian side of the field, but Israeli soldiers and civilians are also numbered among the dead (although in preposterously smaller numbers). A young man called Nitai Stern died today in the course of his military service. I say “in the course of his military service” because he wasn’t, in fact, killed by enemy fire. Nitai was shot down by “friendly fire” (I’ll never get that, really.)

המלחמה בעזה גובה הרוגים בעיקר בצד הפלסטיני, אך גם אזרחים וחיילים ישראלים נמנים בין ההרוגים במערכה הנוכחית בעזה. בחור צעיר בשם ניתאי שטרן נהרג היום במהלך שירותו הצבאי. יש לציין ש”במהלך שירותו הצבאי” אינו שווה ערך ל”במהלך תפקידו” מבחינתי, שכן ניתאי לא נהרג מפגיעת אש האויב. ניתאי נהרג ע”י “אש ידידותית” (ביטוי שלעולם לא אצליח להבין).

מה שאני מוצא מוזר במיוחד בארוע טרגי זה הוא שאמו של ניתאי, שרה, לא אמרה שהיא סולחת לחיילים שאחראים למות בנה, אלא אדרבא, היא “מחבקת אותם”.

לעניות דעתי, מדובר בחוסר שפיות. איני יכול להבין כיצד כל אדם שבאמת ובתמים אוהב את ילדיו יכול לסלוח לאלו האחראים למותם, בין אם בכוונה או לא. אשמה אינה שווה לאחריות, אך הדבר נכון רק עבור עיניים בלתי משוחדות. עיניהן של אמהות שכולות אינן עיניים בלתי משוחדות.

רק חברה המטפחת עידוד מוחלט לצבאה יכולה לייצר בני אנוש אשר חנים הריגת אדם אם הדבר נעשה במסגרת צבאית. (איני טוען שכך הדבר עבור שרה שטרן, אני רק מעלה את האפשרות שייתכן שכך) רק אנשים שאיבדו את דעתם ללאומיות יכולים להמנע מזעם אדום-עיניים ומרתיח-דם כלפיי כל אחד, חבר או אויב, האחראי למותו של בשר מבשרם

אני יודע שמותו של ניתאי אינו נובע מאשמתם של החיילים שאחראים למותו, אבל אני איני מסוגל להבין כיצד מישהו יכול “לחבק” את אלו שבטעות הרסנית גרמו לקטילת ילדיהם.

נוח על משכבך בשלום, ניתאי, ושלום גם להורייך.

The war in Gaza has taken most of its toll on the Palestinian side of the field, but Israeli soldiers and civilians are also numbered among the dead (although in preposterously smaller numbers). A young man called Nitai Stern died today in the course of his military service. I say “in the course of his military service” because he wasn’t, in fact, killed by enemy fire. Nitai was shot down by “friendly fire” (I’ll never get that, really.)

What I find particularly strange about this tragic event is that Nitai’s mother, Sarah, said that not only does she forgive the soldiers who initiated the friendly fire that resulted in her son’s death, but she “embraces them”.

In my opinion, this is madness. I can not perceive how anyone who truly loves and cherishes their children can possibly forgive those responsible for their children’s death, either intentionally or not. Guilt is not the same as responsibility, but this is only true through impartial eyes. Bereaved mothers’ eyes aren’t impartial.

Only a society that fosters absolute dedication to its military can generate human beings who pardon manslaughter if it is done in a military setting (I do not claim that this is the case for Sarah Stern, but I am raising the possibility. It could simply be Sarah’s way of coping with the loss, and I of all people should know that there is no “right way” to mourn).  One who is truly crazed with nationalism can spare anger, red-eyed, blood-gushing anger, at anyone, friend or foe, who is responsible for the death of one’s flesh and blood.

I know that this death is not the fault of those who are responsible for it, and accidents do happen. But I simply cannot understand how anyone can embrace those who by calamitous mistake took the life of their own children.

Rest in peace, Nitai, and may peace befall upon your parents, as well.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , ,

6 Responses to “A Bereaved Mother I Don’t Get – אם שכולה שאיני מבין”

  1. גגגג Says:

    היא מחבקת אותם אולי כי היא יודעת שהם וודאי חשים איום ונורא. ואולי היא יודעת שבדומה לבנה גם הם בני 18. אולי היא רואה הרבה מן המשותף בינהם לבנה וחשה אחריות כלפיהם. את בנה היא לא תקבל בחזרה, וברור לה שאנשים שהרגו בשוגג חבר שלהם חיים בסיוט, והיא מבקשת להגיד להם שאין בליבה עליהם, ונראה לי שזה מאוד אנושי

  2. Einat Says:

    אני חושבת שזה סוג של עילוי, להרגיש ככה אחרי שהבן שלך מת. אולי היא פשוט מנסה לעשות את הדבר הנכון בזה שהיא "מחבקת את החיילים". גם אני לא מצליחה להבין את זה. בכלל.

  3. Jeff Says:

    I don't have anything to say about the comments above, as I can't read them. So perhaps what I have to say is a bit repetitious.
    There are all sorts of good or bad reasons why the mom might have said and felt the way she did.
    The interpretation that I'm choosing to take is that her reaction is beauitful.

    I think that our only hope is that we get past our instinctive, animalastic, gut reactions to things.
    I don't claim to be there yet. But I know people who have been able to lose a dearly loved one under circumstances where it would be natural to be filled up with hate. I have had the honor of watching people say and do things like this mother.
    What I know is that they weren't unfeeling. They experienced the loss just as deeply– perhaps more so– than less spiritually-ethically mature people.

  4. Jeff Says:

    The Budhists have this really powerful way of putting it. They describe the mind as a deep lake. On the surface, the waters might be choppy and turbulent. But what we should strive for, they say, is that beneath the surface the waters be calm and untroubled. (A buddhist would, however, go about this in quite a different way than someone out of a clearly theistic tradition, though.)

    Friendly fire is inevitable in combat. I don't know enough combat to understand the nuts and bolts of that. But it is. Even if being consumed by rage would be a helpful reaction, I'd suggest it'd be much more logical to direct this rage toward the source of the conflict itself.
    Of course, there are numerous more sinister reasons that the mother might have reacted the way she did. But I don't have enough information to really know if that's the case.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: